Bow-Wows & Meows: Understanding the Rescue Adoption Process

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ButtercupAs I sometimes help with application processing for Rose’s Rescue, I have heard from disgruntled applicants. It really does bother me that I have made someone unhappy, but there are rules and procedures that need to be followed when dealing with a legitimate pet rescue.

First, people get the urge to have a dog or a cat and go online and start applying for animals they like the looks of. I am sure they do not read the biography thoroughly or they would not apply for some of the animals they do. They go by the looks of the animal only.

Once they apply, they of course instantly want to meet the animal. Well, a trip to a local shelter, yes, you can meet the animal and actually adopt the animal that day. Not so with most rescue groups. You may be able to do this at an adoption event, but still, many rescue groups require you to fill out an application which then must be processed.

When an application comes in for a dog, first I try to determine if the animal actually fits what the applicant is looking for. The next step is to contact the applicant’s veterinarian, if they have one, or their personal references if no vet is listed. If the applicant rents a home, we will also contact the landlord. Then an interview over the phone. Then a home visit may be required.

People have to remember that we are all volunteers and do this in our spare time. They instantly want the animal, but it just does not work out that way. We do the best we can.

Then sometimes we may feel the applicant may not give the animal the best home. If they have a past history of not keeping their animals up to date with yearly vaccines or on heartworm preventive, we may feel they will not keep a new animal up to date.

Sometimes young children are in the household and that may not be the best thing for the animal.

I have received the remark that we do not really want to adopt out these animals. Just the opposite. We so strongly do want to adopt out the animals, but we need to know they are going to a good, secure, loving home. We rescued the animal once; we do not want to have to rescue them a second time. We actually take this task quite seriously. I consider all the animals as if I were re-homing one of my own.

ShilohSo if you truly wish to adopt a rescued animal, please fill out the application completely and honestly. Please be patient with the rescue workers. Please understand that there are legitimate reasons your application could be denied. We try to do the best we can for these poor misplaced souls. Our hearts are in the right place. We are not trying to make you angry.

Contact your veterinarian immediately and give them permission to release your information to the rescue. Many vets will not release the information without your permission. This has held up many applications I have worked on, and some have missed out on adopting the animal because they did not do this.

What if more than one application comes in for an animal? We generally do not use the first come first serve policy. We process all the applications and attempt to determine which is the best fit for the animal.

Then there is an adoption fee. All rescue groups have different fees. Remember, the animal comes to you up to date with vaccines, and spayed or neutered. They should have been tested for heartworm and feline FIV and feline leukemia. The cost of vetting an animal these days is not cheap, so please understand, the money is to cover these costs and allow the rescue to take in more animals to help. It is not a money making business, that is for sure.

Also know, that some rescue groups have more stringent requirements than others. It may not seem right to many, but it is for the protection of the animals.

If this process is too long and drawn out for you, please go to the local Dog Warden’s shelter or Animal Protective League. That too is rescuing – believe me. The rescue groups pull most of their animals from area dog pounds.

I thank everyone I meet that tells me they have taken in a stray or rescued an animal on their own or adopted from a shelter or rescue group. We are all rescuers when we take in a homeless pet, no matter what the circumstances. So thank you to all you rescuers out there!!

There are groups on Facebook that share animals that are in need of a home in shelters all over the country. These people are wonderful. They set up transports for the animals. It is amazing what they do. You might start out by checking out Rescue Me Ohio on Facebook if you think you might like to look into this. You can connect with many other groups from there. Also on Facebook is a group called Facebook FURever Homes~Portage County. You will need to become a member. People post animals in need of homes or if they are looking for a specific type animal. You might want to check them out.

For those of you that have commented to me they do not want to bring home someone else’s problems: Yep, people do create a lot of the problems with the dogs by not training them at an early age. They become big and unruly and end up at the pound. They are good loving dogs that just need some direction.

All animals take a little work, but most rescue animals know they have been abandoned. They become the most wonderful pets. Remember, they do not know what is going on or why they had to move out of their home. They just do what they have learned. You can be that one person that gives them the time and love they need. Show them what it is you wish them to do. They will give you all the love that they have.

Remember, you can be the one.

I read this recent post on Facebook:
Rescuing is neither easy nor cheap! Here’s a handy little infographic to help break down what reputable rescues do and how much it costs. Please keep in mind that this is the absolute minimum they do for every dog that enters the rescue’s care. Many of the dogs they take in require further vet treatment. In addition to vet costs, your donations go towards food, crates, collars, leashes, and other miscellaneous expenses.

infograph

senior-pet 1

PoppieHere is Poppie. A 7 year young Min Pin mix. Another sweet loving guy that could use a quiet home with people that are not gone a lot. He too would like a lap to sit on. Fill out an application at www.rosesrescue.net

Willow-Leo-featureHi, My name is Leo and I am a 10 year old 15 to 20 pound standard size Dachshund male. My best friend Willow and I came to the rescue because our owner died. Our foster mom says we are both sweethearts. We are house and crate trained. I have chronic dry eye, and no teeth but I am neutered and up to date on shots. I am good with all people – large and small and other dogs too. Won’t you please consider giving us a good loving home in our senior years? We will be waiting for you.

Please visit Rose’s Rescue to see all of the wonderful animals available.

And if you have adopted a pet, please share your comments below!

 

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